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Monthly Archives: July 2009

FAQ #5 (A Tilt-a-Whirl Costco Pack)

Since Notes from the Tilt-a-Whirl released, questions have been rolling in. These questions have come in a barrage, and so I’m going to respond in a barrage (at least to the most reoccurring of them–and to one or two that were just fun).

1. Were you inspired to write this book by Donald Miller’s Blue Like Jazz?

A. No. I’ve actually never read any of Miller’s stuff. I have Read the rest of this entry »

Why Tilt the World?

So, I have a new book out. It’s not for kids. At least it’s not for kids in the traditional Disney-Channel-no-inappropriate-material sense. There is plenty of inappropriate material, because it is a book about the world and, well, the world is typically inappropriate (and if you’ve ever watched footage of slugs mating, you know what I mean). The book is called Notes from the Tilt-a-Whirl, and it is a collection of creative non-fiction essays and sketches arranged (structurally and thematically) around the seasons. And the seasons are just the different quartiles of space through which this freakishly tiny sphere of ours does its circular zipping.

In high school and then college and then graduate school, I never focused on the study of creative writing. Read the rest of this entry »

Notes from the Tilt-a-Whirl (The Book Trailer)

Check it out, yo.

Notes from the Tilt-a-Whirl trailer from Gorilla Poet Productions on Vimeo.

Books from My Past, Pt. 2 (Where Solomon Kept His Diamonds)

At some point in my pre-adolescence (not that I could exactly pinpoint my age), my mother began to lobby me with a book. I’m sure that I had been doing some profound limp-rag-draped-over-the-arm-of-the-couch-I-don’t-have-anything-good-to-read muttering when she first asked me something like, “Have you read King’s Solomon’s Mines?”

The limp rag shook its head.

“You should.”

The thing was, I didn’t want to. I hadn’t the least little inclination to pick up that book with the old binding and the rough-cut pages. It was . . . old. And old books had awkward English and ridiculous characters unable to function as human beings. Such was my wisdom. Read the rest of this entry »